PORK SUPPLY CHAIN, CONSUMPTION AND RISK FACTORS FOR INFECTIONS OF CONSUMERS IN THE ABIDJAN DISTRICT (CÔTE D'IVOIRE)

Koua ATOBLA, Edwige Essoma AKOA, Carole Aya BONNY, Adjehi DADIÉ, Germain Tago KAROU, Sebastien NIAMKE

Abstract

The ban on the consumption of game throughout Côte d'Ivoire by the emergence of Ebola haemorrhagic fever prompted consumers to turn to other sources of animal protein, such as pork. There is more frequent consumption of pork in more urban areas. It is in this context that a transversal and retrospective survey was performed in 12 communes of the Abidjan District with 3,200 people in order to assess pork supply chain, the level of consumption and environmental infection risks of consumers. Pork meat and pork products supply chain for marketing were revealed. Of the 3,200 people surveyed, 2,400 (75%) reported being consumers of pork at home and out-ofhome. Pork was consumed smoked, fried and fresh cooked in sauce at home. Thus, male (63.6%) and female (44.9%) have a preference for smoked pork at home. Out-of-home, baked pork was the most consumed by women (41.3%). Consumers reported some infections of pork after consumption. Symptoms such as diarrhea was more common in men (47.9%) followed by abdominal pain (22.8%), fever (21.1%) and vomiting (2.5%). Thus, the conditions of transport, hygiene and the mode of consumption and handling of pork observed during the investigation could constitute risk factors for infections in the Abidjan District. Therefore, good hygiene practices in the processing of pork from farm to slaughter, transport, marketing and consumption can decrease the risk of infection. So, the best means of preventing the risk for pork consumers remains the compliance with good hygiene practices.

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